Archive for the ‘ insects of kilome ’ Category

Caterpillar Easter

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This Easter was ‘caterpillar Easter’
Caterpillars, caterpillars and more caterpilars…Mother’s carrying babies first inspected you to ensure you had no caterpillars on your clothing before allowing you to handle their babies

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What species of butterfly/moth were these and why Soooo many!!?

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Kilome’s ‘Bunny Face’ spiders

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Over time weirder and interesting things turn up in Kilome like this spider with a mischievous looking ‘bunny face’

Ghost Mantis of Kilome

dead leaf mantis of kilome

ghost mantis of kilome ©muoki kioko2016

dead leaf mantis of kilome2

ghost mantis profile © muoki kioko2017

Awesome spider in kilome

Boxing spiders of Kilome

©muoki kioko 2016

Armed with ‘black gloves’, protecting their bloodshot Red eyes are these ‘boxing spiders’ in kilome.

At home both on surfaces or as they glide ‘still’ on water surfaces – looking always ready to throw in a fewww punches on anything in their way. 

Armed with a front set of 4 Eyes and another two smaller eyes on the side, they are unalarmed at bigger objects in front of them like YoU!

*ID’d by Zarek Cocker as a ‘Salticidae – jumping spider’

Cowpea weevil/Beetle

It’s harvest time for legumes, beans, peas, cowpeas, green grams and the like. To store them, they are 1st dried.
How ever, one small “dudu/insect” awaits the dry legume

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cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus close up ©muokikioko2016

The cowpea weevil, (Callosobruchus maculatus). Purpose is to replicate using the pea/bean dry seed as food for it’s young.
Females lay 100’s of eggs

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cowpea weevil eggs ©muokikioko 2016

that hatch in 8 days or less on the surface, which then burrow into the legume emerging
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3-7 weeks later

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by breaking the thin membrane on surface of bean, leaving holes around the legume.
An agricultural pest to many small scale farmers

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It is sometimes controlled by application of crushed dry coffee weed/stinking weed leaves.

*HD video on the same available

photos and text
©muoki kioko
2009-2016
email:muokikioko@gmail.com

Bee products that can be done in kilome

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1. Bee keeping Manual:
http://teca.fao.org/sites/default/files/resources/Advance%20beekeeping%20manual%20Pam%20Gregory.pdf

2. HoneyBees Deceases and pests: practicle guide
ftp://ftp.fao.org/docrep/fao/012/a0849e/a0849e00.pdf

3. BEE VALUE ADDITION
CHAPTER 1 – INTRODUCTION
1.1 What are value added products from beekeeping?
1.2 The purpose of this bulletin
1.3 How to use this bulletin
CHAPTER 2 HONEY
2.1 Introduction
2.2 Physical characteristics of honey
2.3 The composition of honey
2.4 The physiological effects of
honey
2.4.1 Unconfirmed circumstantial evidence
2.4.2 Scientific evidence
2.5 The uses of honey today
2.5.1 As a food
2.5.2 As a food ingredient
2.5.3 As an ingredient in medicine-like products
2.5.4 Products of honey
fermentation
2.5.5 Others
2.6 Honey harvesting and
processing
2.6.1 Colony management
2.6.2 Unifloral honeys
2.6.3 Contamination during
production
2.6.4 Contamination during
harvesting
2.6.5 Cleanliness
2.6.6 Processing
2.6.7 Purification
2.6.8 Moisture content
2.6.9 Prevention of fermentation
2.6.10 Heating
2.6.11 Packaging
2.7 Storage
2.8 Quality control
2.9 Caution
2.10 Market outlook
2.11 Honey from other bees
2.12 Recipes
2.12.1 Liquid honey
2.12.2 Creamed honey
2.12.3 Comb honey
2.12.4 Mead
2.12.5 Honey beer
2.12.6 Honey liqueurs
2.12.7 Honey spreads
2.12.8 Honey with fruits and nuts
2.12.9 Honey with pollen and
propolis
2.12.10 Honey paste for dressing
wounds
2.12.11 Sugar substitution
2.12.12 Fruit marmalade
2.12.13 Honey jelly
2.12.14 Syrups
2.12.15 Rose honey
2.12.16 Caramels
2.12.17 Nougat and torrone
2.12.18 Honey gums
2.12.19 Gingerbread
2.12.20 Marzipan
2.12.21 Honey in bakery products
CHAPTER 3 – POLLEN
3.1 Introduction
3.2 Physical characteristics of
pollen
3.3 The composition of pollen
3.4 The physiological effects of
pollen
3.4.1 Unconfirmed circumstantial evidence
3.4.2 Scientific evidence
3.5 The uses of pollen today
3.5.1 As medicine
3.5.2 As food
3.5.3 In cosmetics
3.5.4 For pollination
3.5.5 For pollution monitoring
3.6 Pollen collection
3.7 Pollen buying
3.8 Storage
3.9 Quality control
3.10 Caution
3.11 Market outlook
3.12 Recipes
3.12.1 Pollen extract
3.12.2 Beebread (after Dany,1988)
3.12.3 Honev with pollen
3.12.4 Granola or breakfast cereals
3.12.5 Candy bars
3.12.6 Pollen supplements and
substitutes in beekeeping
3.12.7 Cosmetics
3.12.8 Pills and capsules
CHAPTER 4 – WAX
4.1 Introduction
4.2 Physical characteristics of bees wax
4.3The composition of beeswax
4.4 The physiological effects of wax
4.5 The uses of wax today
4.5.1 In beekeeping
4.5.2 For candle making
4.5.3 For metal castings and
modelling
4.5.4 In cosmetics
4.5.5 Food processing
4.5.6 Industrial technology
4.5.7 Textiles
4.5.8 Varnishes and polishes
4.5.9 Printing
4.5.10 Medicine
4.5.11 Others
4.6 Wax collection and processing
4.7 Buying
4.8 Storage
4.9 Quality control
4.10 Market outlook
4.11 Recipes
4.11.1 Bleached wax
4.11.2 Candle makin2
4.11.3 Cosmetics
4.11.4 Grafting wax for horticulture
4.11.5 Polishes and varnishes
4.11.6 Cravons
4.11.7 Leather preserves
4.11.8 Waterproofing textiles and paper
4.11.9 Paint
4.11.10 Wood preservative
4.11.11 Swarm lure
4.11.12 Topical ointment for burns
4.11.13 Veterinary wound cream
4.11.14 Adhesive
4.11.15 Determination of
saponification cloud point
(1uoted from ITCg 1978)
CHAPTER 5 – PROPOLIS
5.1 Introduction
5.2 Physical characteristics of
propolis
5.3 The composition of propolis
5.4 The physiological effects of
propolis 1
5.4.1 Unconfirmed circumstantial evidence
5.4.2 Scientific evidence
5.5 The uses of propolis today
5.5.1 In cosmetics
5.5.2 In medicine
5.5.3 Traditional use
5.5.4 Food technology
5.5.5 Others
5.6 Formulations and application
methods for human and animal use
5.6.1 Raw
5.6.2 Liquid extracts
5.6.3 Additives
5.6.4 Injection
5.7 Extraction methods
5.8 Collection
5.9 Buying
5.10 Storage
5.11 Quality control
5.12 Market outlook
5.13 Caution
5.14 Patents including propolis
5.15 Information sources
5.16 Recipes
5.16.1 Ointments
5.16.2 Oral and nasal spravs
5.16.3 Suntan lotions
5.16.4 Propolis syrups or honeys
5.16.5 Propolis tablets
5.16.6 Propolis shampoo
5.16.7 Anti-dandruff lotion
5.16.8 Propolis toothpaste
5.16.9 Anaesthetic propolis paste
5.16.10 Creams
5.16.11 Facial masks
5.16.12 Micro-encapsulation
5.16.13 Ouality tests for antioxidant activity
CHAPTER 6 – ROYAL JELLY
6.1 Introduction
6.2 Physical characteristics of royal jelly
6.3 The composition of royal jelly
6.4 The phsiological effects of royal jelly
6.4.1 On honeybees
6.4.2 Unconfirmed circumstantial evidence
6.4.3 Scientific evidence
6.5 Uses and marketing of royal
jelly
6.5.1 Dietary supplement
6.5.2 As ingredient in food
products
6.5.3 As ingredient in medicine-like products
6.5.4 Ingredient in cosmetics
6.5.5 Others
6.6 Royal jelly collection
6.7 Storage
6.8 Quality control
6.9 Caution
6.10 Market outlook
6.11 Recipes
6.11.1 Freeze-dried (lyouhilised)
royal iellvy
6.11.2 Honey with royal jelly
6.11.3 Yoghurt with royal lelly
6.11.4 Jellies and soft caramels
6.11.5 Liquid preparations
6.11.6 Dried juice concentrate
6.11.7 Tablets
6.11.8 Capsules
6.11.9 Cosmetics
CHAPTER 7 VENOM
7.1 Introduction
7.2 Physical characteristics of
venom
7.3 The composition of venom
7.4 The physiological effects of
venom
7.4.1 Unconfirmed circumstantial evidence
7.4.2 Scientific evidence
7.5 The use of venom today
7.6 Venom collection
7.7 Venom products
7.8 Buying
7.9 Storage
7.10 Quality control
7.11 Caution
7.12 Market outlook
7.13 Recipes
CHAPTER 8 – ADULT AND LARVAL
HONEYBEES
8.1 Introduction
8.2 The chemical composition of
adult and larval honeybees
8.3 The uses of adult bees and
larvae
8.3.1 For beekeeping
8.3.2 For pollination
8.3.3 As food
8.3.4 As medicine
8.3.5 In cosmetics
8.4 Collection
8.4.1 Adult bees
8.4.2 Honeybee larvae
8.5 Buying
8.6 Storage
8.7 Quality control
8.8 Caution
8.9 Market outlook
8.10 Recipes
8.10.1 Preparation of mature and immature bees for human
consumption
8.10.2 Bakutig traditional recipe
from Nepal (Bur2ettg 1990)
8.10.3 Frozen larvaeg pupae or
adults
8.10.4 Rawg fried and boiled larvae
8.10.5 Dried larvae and adults
8.10.6 Basic general recipes
8.10.7 Bee mango chutney
8.10.8 Bee chapattis
8.10.9 Pastry
8.10.10 Popmoth
8.10.11 Bee sweets and chocolate coated bees
8.10.12 How to raise and harvest
wax moth larvae
CHAPTER 9a COSMETICS
9.1 Introduction
9.2 Description of product types
9.2.1 Lotions
9.2.2 Ointments
9.2.3 Creams
9.2.4 Shampoos
9.2.5 Soaps
9.2.6 Toothpastes and mouth rinses
9.2.7 Deodorants
9.2.8 Facial masks
9.2.9 Make-up
9.2.10 Lipsticks
9.2.11 Perfumes
9.3 The sources of ingredients
9.3.1 Local
9.3.2 Imported
9.4 Technical requirements
9.4.1 Raw materials
9.4.2 Equipment
9.4.3 Emulsions
9.4.4 Mixing
9.4.5 Colouring
9.5 Advantages and applications of primary bee products in cosmetics
9.6 Buying
9.7 Storage
9.8 Quality control
9.9 Packaging and presentation
9.10 Marketing
9.11 Caution
9.12 Market outlook
CHAPTER 9b COSMETICS
9.13 Recipes
9.13.1 Lotions
9.13.2 Ointments
9.13.3 Creams
9.13.4 Sun protection
9.13.5 Shampoos
9.13.6 Solid soaps
9.13.7 Liquid soaps
9.13.8 Toothpaste and mouth rinses
9.13.9 Deodorants
9.13.10 Face packs Honey face pack
9.13.11 Make-up
9. 13.12 Lipsticks and glosses
9.13.13 Depilatory waxes
9.13 14 Shaving preparations
ANNEXES
BIBLIOGRAPHY
LIST OF ADDRESSES
WEIGHT AND VOLUME
CONVERSIONS
CODEX ALIMENTARIUS
CODEX STANDARD FOR HONEY

NOTE:
Industrial activity & pollution sources like high vehicle traffic nearby affects bee product quality leading to much lower prices in markets!

*bonus
WHAT HAPPENS WHEN BEES SUE MAN FOR BEING USED??

*making beehives & other be processing equipment manuals for fundis :http://www.beesource.com/build-it-yourself/

Text & Images
©Muoki Kioko 2009-2014
email: muokikioko@gmail.com
All rights reserved.

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