Archive for the ‘ fruits ’ Category

kilome Avocadoes

Can be served with slices of bread as a snack

or Served – ‘Hot n Sweat’

to thrill your tongue..

​the only thing local parents/traders warrat you, is..

Livestock Feeds

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Grasses of kilome © muoki kioko 2016

PASTURE
Brachiaria brizantha (Signal grass)
Brachiaria decumbens
Brachiaria milliformis
Brachiaria mutica (Para grass, Water grass)
Brachiaria ruziziensis (Ruzi grass)
Cenchrus ciliaris (Buffel grass)
Cynodon species
Dactylis glomerata (cocksfoot)
Digitaria decubens (Pangola grass)
Panicum maximum (Guinea grass)
Panicum maximum (Hamil grass)
Paspalum plicatulum
Urvillei
Pennisetum clandestinum (Kikuya grass)
Setaria sphacelata
Tripsacum laxum (Gautamala grass) etc.

LEGUMES
Centrosema pubescens
Desmodium intortum (Green leaf desmodium)
Desmodium uncinatum (Silver leaf desmodium)
Dolichos axillaris
Dolichos lab lab (lab lab bean)
Gliricidia maculata
Glicine javanica
Glicine wightii
Leucaena leucocephala (ipil-ipil)
Phaseolus atropurpureous(Siratro)
Pueraria phaseo-loides (Tropical Kudzu)
Stylosanthes guyanensis (Cook stylo)
Stylosanthes hamata
Stylosanthes humilis (Townsville lucerne)
Styzolobium atterimum (Velvet bean)
Trifolium pratense (Red clover)
Trifolium repens (White clover)
Trifolium rupellianum (African clover)
Trifolium semipilosum (Kenya white clover).

FODDERS
Some of the varieties listed under pastures and
legumes can also be used as fodders, e.g.
Brachiaria ruziziensis
Panicum varieties
Paspulum varieties
Glyricidia
Leucaena etc.
Some varieties that are used mainly as fodders are:
Pennisetum purpureum (Napier grass or Elephant grass) and its newly developed hybrids such as:
“NB 21” or “Poosa Giant Napier”
Fodder maize varieties
Newly developed hybrids
Fodder sorghum varieties
Newly developed hybrids etc.

adapted from Food & Agriculture organization (FAO)

photos and text
©muoki kioko
2009-2016
email:muokikioko@gmail.com

Bee products that can be done in kilome

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1. Bee keeping Manual:
http://teca.fao.org/sites/default/files/resources/Advance%20beekeeping%20manual%20Pam%20Gregory.pdf

2. HoneyBees Deceases and pests: practicle guide
ftp://ftp.fao.org/docrep/fao/012/a0849e/a0849e00.pdf

3. BEE VALUE ADDITION
CHAPTER 1 – INTRODUCTION
1.1 What are value added products from beekeeping?
1.2 The purpose of this bulletin
1.3 How to use this bulletin
CHAPTER 2 HONEY
2.1 Introduction
2.2 Physical characteristics of honey
2.3 The composition of honey
2.4 The physiological effects of
honey
2.4.1 Unconfirmed circumstantial evidence
2.4.2 Scientific evidence
2.5 The uses of honey today
2.5.1 As a food
2.5.2 As a food ingredient
2.5.3 As an ingredient in medicine-like products
2.5.4 Products of honey
fermentation
2.5.5 Others
2.6 Honey harvesting and
processing
2.6.1 Colony management
2.6.2 Unifloral honeys
2.6.3 Contamination during
production
2.6.4 Contamination during
harvesting
2.6.5 Cleanliness
2.6.6 Processing
2.6.7 Purification
2.6.8 Moisture content
2.6.9 Prevention of fermentation
2.6.10 Heating
2.6.11 Packaging
2.7 Storage
2.8 Quality control
2.9 Caution
2.10 Market outlook
2.11 Honey from other bees
2.12 Recipes
2.12.1 Liquid honey
2.12.2 Creamed honey
2.12.3 Comb honey
2.12.4 Mead
2.12.5 Honey beer
2.12.6 Honey liqueurs
2.12.7 Honey spreads
2.12.8 Honey with fruits and nuts
2.12.9 Honey with pollen and
propolis
2.12.10 Honey paste for dressing
wounds
2.12.11 Sugar substitution
2.12.12 Fruit marmalade
2.12.13 Honey jelly
2.12.14 Syrups
2.12.15 Rose honey
2.12.16 Caramels
2.12.17 Nougat and torrone
2.12.18 Honey gums
2.12.19 Gingerbread
2.12.20 Marzipan
2.12.21 Honey in bakery products
CHAPTER 3 – POLLEN
3.1 Introduction
3.2 Physical characteristics of
pollen
3.3 The composition of pollen
3.4 The physiological effects of
pollen
3.4.1 Unconfirmed circumstantial evidence
3.4.2 Scientific evidence
3.5 The uses of pollen today
3.5.1 As medicine
3.5.2 As food
3.5.3 In cosmetics
3.5.4 For pollination
3.5.5 For pollution monitoring
3.6 Pollen collection
3.7 Pollen buying
3.8 Storage
3.9 Quality control
3.10 Caution
3.11 Market outlook
3.12 Recipes
3.12.1 Pollen extract
3.12.2 Beebread (after Dany,1988)
3.12.3 Honev with pollen
3.12.4 Granola or breakfast cereals
3.12.5 Candy bars
3.12.6 Pollen supplements and
substitutes in beekeeping
3.12.7 Cosmetics
3.12.8 Pills and capsules
CHAPTER 4 – WAX
4.1 Introduction
4.2 Physical characteristics of bees wax
4.3The composition of beeswax
4.4 The physiological effects of wax
4.5 The uses of wax today
4.5.1 In beekeeping
4.5.2 For candle making
4.5.3 For metal castings and
modelling
4.5.4 In cosmetics
4.5.5 Food processing
4.5.6 Industrial technology
4.5.7 Textiles
4.5.8 Varnishes and polishes
4.5.9 Printing
4.5.10 Medicine
4.5.11 Others
4.6 Wax collection and processing
4.7 Buying
4.8 Storage
4.9 Quality control
4.10 Market outlook
4.11 Recipes
4.11.1 Bleached wax
4.11.2 Candle makin2
4.11.3 Cosmetics
4.11.4 Grafting wax for horticulture
4.11.5 Polishes and varnishes
4.11.6 Cravons
4.11.7 Leather preserves
4.11.8 Waterproofing textiles and paper
4.11.9 Paint
4.11.10 Wood preservative
4.11.11 Swarm lure
4.11.12 Topical ointment for burns
4.11.13 Veterinary wound cream
4.11.14 Adhesive
4.11.15 Determination of
saponification cloud point
(1uoted from ITCg 1978)
CHAPTER 5 – PROPOLIS
5.1 Introduction
5.2 Physical characteristics of
propolis
5.3 The composition of propolis
5.4 The physiological effects of
propolis 1
5.4.1 Unconfirmed circumstantial evidence
5.4.2 Scientific evidence
5.5 The uses of propolis today
5.5.1 In cosmetics
5.5.2 In medicine
5.5.3 Traditional use
5.5.4 Food technology
5.5.5 Others
5.6 Formulations and application
methods for human and animal use
5.6.1 Raw
5.6.2 Liquid extracts
5.6.3 Additives
5.6.4 Injection
5.7 Extraction methods
5.8 Collection
5.9 Buying
5.10 Storage
5.11 Quality control
5.12 Market outlook
5.13 Caution
5.14 Patents including propolis
5.15 Information sources
5.16 Recipes
5.16.1 Ointments
5.16.2 Oral and nasal spravs
5.16.3 Suntan lotions
5.16.4 Propolis syrups or honeys
5.16.5 Propolis tablets
5.16.6 Propolis shampoo
5.16.7 Anti-dandruff lotion
5.16.8 Propolis toothpaste
5.16.9 Anaesthetic propolis paste
5.16.10 Creams
5.16.11 Facial masks
5.16.12 Micro-encapsulation
5.16.13 Ouality tests for antioxidant activity
CHAPTER 6 – ROYAL JELLY
6.1 Introduction
6.2 Physical characteristics of royal jelly
6.3 The composition of royal jelly
6.4 The phsiological effects of royal jelly
6.4.1 On honeybees
6.4.2 Unconfirmed circumstantial evidence
6.4.3 Scientific evidence
6.5 Uses and marketing of royal
jelly
6.5.1 Dietary supplement
6.5.2 As ingredient in food
products
6.5.3 As ingredient in medicine-like products
6.5.4 Ingredient in cosmetics
6.5.5 Others
6.6 Royal jelly collection
6.7 Storage
6.8 Quality control
6.9 Caution
6.10 Market outlook
6.11 Recipes
6.11.1 Freeze-dried (lyouhilised)
royal iellvy
6.11.2 Honey with royal jelly
6.11.3 Yoghurt with royal lelly
6.11.4 Jellies and soft caramels
6.11.5 Liquid preparations
6.11.6 Dried juice concentrate
6.11.7 Tablets
6.11.8 Capsules
6.11.9 Cosmetics
CHAPTER 7 VENOM
7.1 Introduction
7.2 Physical characteristics of
venom
7.3 The composition of venom
7.4 The physiological effects of
venom
7.4.1 Unconfirmed circumstantial evidence
7.4.2 Scientific evidence
7.5 The use of venom today
7.6 Venom collection
7.7 Venom products
7.8 Buying
7.9 Storage
7.10 Quality control
7.11 Caution
7.12 Market outlook
7.13 Recipes
CHAPTER 8 – ADULT AND LARVAL
HONEYBEES
8.1 Introduction
8.2 The chemical composition of
adult and larval honeybees
8.3 The uses of adult bees and
larvae
8.3.1 For beekeeping
8.3.2 For pollination
8.3.3 As food
8.3.4 As medicine
8.3.5 In cosmetics
8.4 Collection
8.4.1 Adult bees
8.4.2 Honeybee larvae
8.5 Buying
8.6 Storage
8.7 Quality control
8.8 Caution
8.9 Market outlook
8.10 Recipes
8.10.1 Preparation of mature and immature bees for human
consumption
8.10.2 Bakutig traditional recipe
from Nepal (Bur2ettg 1990)
8.10.3 Frozen larvaeg pupae or
adults
8.10.4 Rawg fried and boiled larvae
8.10.5 Dried larvae and adults
8.10.6 Basic general recipes
8.10.7 Bee mango chutney
8.10.8 Bee chapattis
8.10.9 Pastry
8.10.10 Popmoth
8.10.11 Bee sweets and chocolate coated bees
8.10.12 How to raise and harvest
wax moth larvae
CHAPTER 9a COSMETICS
9.1 Introduction
9.2 Description of product types
9.2.1 Lotions
9.2.2 Ointments
9.2.3 Creams
9.2.4 Shampoos
9.2.5 Soaps
9.2.6 Toothpastes and mouth rinses
9.2.7 Deodorants
9.2.8 Facial masks
9.2.9 Make-up
9.2.10 Lipsticks
9.2.11 Perfumes
9.3 The sources of ingredients
9.3.1 Local
9.3.2 Imported
9.4 Technical requirements
9.4.1 Raw materials
9.4.2 Equipment
9.4.3 Emulsions
9.4.4 Mixing
9.4.5 Colouring
9.5 Advantages and applications of primary bee products in cosmetics
9.6 Buying
9.7 Storage
9.8 Quality control
9.9 Packaging and presentation
9.10 Marketing
9.11 Caution
9.12 Market outlook
CHAPTER 9b COSMETICS
9.13 Recipes
9.13.1 Lotions
9.13.2 Ointments
9.13.3 Creams
9.13.4 Sun protection
9.13.5 Shampoos
9.13.6 Solid soaps
9.13.7 Liquid soaps
9.13.8 Toothpaste and mouth rinses
9.13.9 Deodorants
9.13.10 Face packs Honey face pack
9.13.11 Make-up
9. 13.12 Lipsticks and glosses
9.13.13 Depilatory waxes
9.13 14 Shaving preparations
ANNEXES
BIBLIOGRAPHY
LIST OF ADDRESSES
WEIGHT AND VOLUME
CONVERSIONS
CODEX ALIMENTARIUS
CODEX STANDARD FOR HONEY

NOTE:
Industrial activity & pollution sources like high vehicle traffic nearby affects bee product quality leading to much lower prices in markets!

*bonus
WHAT HAPPENS WHEN BEES SUE MAN FOR BEING USED??

*making beehives & other be processing equipment manuals for fundis :http://www.beesource.com/build-it-yourself/

Text & Images
©Muoki Kioko 2009-2014
email: muokikioko@gmail.com
All rights reserved.

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Cassava crunchies in Kilome – value addition part3

Orange cassava crunchies
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Cassava ovacado bite

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Cassava onion bite
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Cassava tomato crunchy

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Copyright Reserved
All images and Text
Muokikioko@gmail.com
2009 – 2014
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Inside Kilome – Salama

 

salama market

Located on Mombasa – Nairobi Highway is this Centre that’s also a beautiful market place cum stop for anyone wishing to stop and stretch from their drive from Mombasa. ie. ideally a place you’d want to stretch before your last leg to Nairobi. Just 100Kms from Nairobi it’s got a large paved parking which can serve well as a point to regroup when traveling from Nairobi headed to the Southern National parks [Amboseli NP & Tsavo NP] or when headed to the coast as a group.

Easily recognizable by the Mosque and Kilome/Nunguni hills in the Background. On Market days you will get a lot of local products from the region (depending on season) like Cassava, banana’s, promagranets(Makukumanga), mangoes, water melons.

Said to have developed on the Directive of Kenya’s first president ‘Jomo Kenyatta’ as a safe market to trade in after the previous market located slightly inland became inconvenient for traders as they disagreed with locals. He is said to have told the traders he will give them pahali Salama- thus the Name.
Interesting places to visit nearby Includes This waterfall

Mama mboga

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Who is Africa without ‘mama mboga’? Which country side in Africa exists without their network supplying vegetables and fruits from local farms.
A lot of times it’s out of necessity to put what she can’t plant on her families table. She therefore goes out and spends her day at market centres displaying her foodstuffs, and what she earns she uses to buy what she can’t produce. Patient, aggressive and persistant they are at times taking care of their dependant ones at their feet all day.
A distinct portrait of mama mboga is her headscarfed head and a Leso tied around the waist with wares displayed on a gunny bag laid on the ground or on a stand improvised from poles at the roadside.
Mama mboga (refers to a mother who sales vegetables) and are a trademark of Kilome and Africa. If you’ve never met any you’ve simply never been to Kilome or Africa.

Mama Mboga – Mama Africa!

Text & Images
©Muoki Kioko 2009-2013
For permissions to use images email: muokisphotography@yahoo.com

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‘Horned Melons’ in Kilome

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Planted and sold locally at roadside fruit banda’s
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Other names:
Thorn Melon
African horned cucumber Melon Gaka/Gakchika (Zimbabwe)
Kiwano (New Zealand)
Jelly Melon
Hedged Gourd
Melano
Blow Fish fruit (USA)

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It’s an annual vine in cucumber and Melon family known to produce upto 100 fruits per creeper and is a source of liquid for ‘Kalahari desert’ peoples during dry season (where the plant originated).

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Fruit Picked and eaten either when young, when fruit is green and kept until it turns yellow/orange or picked when yellow/orange. The inner fruit is sucked the same way as passion fruit. Many people drop out the seeds that are edible, others eat the pulp too.
uses:
– fruit
– fruit juices
– in salads
– in bar cocktails
– ice creams & yorghut
– Health

Known health benefits:
– from it’s seeds 1mg of iron per fruit, that’s higher than a full water melon.
– seeds produce boleic acid and linolec acids one of Omega 6 fatty Acids
– antioxidants a-cocopheral & y tocopheral in seeds (both) organic forms of Vitamin E that is known to create healthy skin & helps neutralize damaging ‘free radicals’ that cause chronic diseases such as Cardiovascular disease and Cancer. It’s also thought to relieve Alzheimers and Parkinsons disease.
– Pigments in seeds & pulp contains Carotenoid & Beta Carotene (Vitamin A) that helps strengthen the body immune system, maintain eye and skin health, while inhibiting growth of free radicals thereby preventing cancer.

Text & Images
©Muoki Kioko 2009-2013
For permissions to use images email: muokisphotography@yahoo.com

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