Archive for the ‘ Makueni County ’ Category

Kilome ‘COACH of the YEAR’

No single child here has been coerced to join in…you can even see 3year olds finding it very entertaining to participate!!

His passion, dedication and love for children and basketball are legendary…

Xtrym gorge trail

A visitor enjoys the soil formations in this water made gorge . The gorge stretches back about 300 metres and is part of a 9hr hiking trail.

Interesting watching how life has adopted to this new feature with butterflies and birds making it home!!

This trail is also famous for it’s farm fresh mangoes and oranges.

BEYOND NORMAL – the climate change Challenge!!

The challenge – Plant trees at ANY Time Of The Year and ensure 100% success rate growth through commitment to see them grow.

This was not the first primary school to take up the challenge in makueni..

The last primary school has achieved a 100% tree growth success rate, the challenge for others is to meet this standard set by their colleague’s in kilome.We hear a lot of..” this is the wrong type of tree to grow here” or ” how can you plant trees at this time of the year”? Well for the children – some other child has done it, therefore failure is the adult near them Not giving them a chance to prove that they can do it too..And as a bonus, this tree planting included a special guest ‘ Africa’s First blind African to Climb the world tallest free standing mountain , as well as Africa’s tallest – Mt. Kilimanjaro – Blind!! Mr Douglas..This event was supported by Community adventure guides Partners – summit seekers, kenya environmental network, kithangathini youth tree nursary, parents, teacher’s, the board and the ever enthusiastic pupils at kituiuni primary!!

Somewhere in kilome..

Strange crucifix tree..

Caterpillar Easter

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This Easter was ‘caterpillar Easter’
Caterpillars, caterpillars and more caterpilars…Mother’s carrying babies first inspected you to ensure you had no caterpillars on your clothing before allowing you to handle their babies

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What species of butterfly/moth were these and why Soooo many!!?

Nzambalau wine 

From this common local fruit called ‘Nzambalau ‘ (below) that drops it’s fruit when it rains

Kili view from kilome

Kilimanjaro from kilome ©muokikioko 2017

Strange visitor in kilome

strange skulker in kilome1©muoki kioko2017

strange skulker in kilome1©muoki kioko2017


Face resembles a weavers but it skulks and the rest of the body is more of greenbul nature (sorry non-birders). Very shy and solitary.

Meanwhile at sunrise..

kilome Avocadoes

Can be served with slices of bread as a snack

or Served – ‘Hot n Sweat’

to thrill your tongue..

​the only thing local parents/traders warrat you, is..

Died, went to Heaven & Returned!!

Just had an encounter with this “buddy” on his back. please don’t laugh coz this is serious stuff!!

Just checked in the loos (external toilets) to loose some weight for the evening! well someone else thought otherwise – as i began loosing weight this giant moth checks in to keep me company and decides to play summers within the 6 walls of the room. Just then messages start checkin in on my phone and i forget the moth.

Suddenly – doof!! then somthing soft pointed hits my lower leg – again and again at different angles. Now thats not a moth!. Look down with the low light of phones screen and this mAaSive Foot long (body) rat is in the small room with me. Now starts the drama….

Drafts masters in kilome

Looks can be decieving!

I’ve watched several young turks judge some of these players by their looks, but these are some of the most entertaining and smartest drafts players i’ve ever come accross in my life with most of their games ending in under a minute.

It would be interesting to see how modern living guests would ‘match-up’ against these residents

Drought?

 Crop failure Kilome ©Muoki Kioko 2017

Crop failure Kilome ©Muoki Kioko 2017

 

Kenya is in a drought situation few have experienced before, with many looking at receiving food Aid. However one young farmer in drought prone Makueni County is having a different conversation – he is busy working out how to expand his farming

NO RIVER, NO WELL!!

The region (kilome) had just come from 6 straight months without a drop of rain, rains came but in a months time No More Rains. People pass by their shambas NOT wanting to look at the dry crops however this young gentleman is busy on his farm

Tomato Farming Kilome ©Muoki Kioko 2017

Drought crop Kilome ©Muoki Kioko 2017

…he say’s

“my grandfather told me of a question his friend asked him:

‘How can water fall over your head, shoulders and onto your feet..then you start chasing after it kilometers away to pick it up after it has washed the ground to use it’?”

Current Harvest Kilome ©Muoki Kioko 2017

He also asks Youth: Do any of you ever do the maths of the work you do?

To those who say it’s expensive; he  started off with the sell of a calf to set up his system of farming (No Bank Loan, No Aid Agencies..).

HIS ADVICE; It’s NOT a competition of who can do it, I’m CONSTANTLY Open to Learning to improve myself – i Do NOT know it ALL!!

*To those willing to learn how he manages to irrigate in such a Hot Dry Area without Rivers – i’m willing to train ANY Youth or Community willing to learn what i’ve learnt farming in Makueni with meagre resources..

 

 

 

 

Paradise birds of Kilome

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Af Paradise Flycatcher – Ferreti ©muoki kioko 2016

i had to literally drop my pants to capture this! 🙂

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Terpsiphone Viridis (white Morph) – ©muoki kioko 2016

6 Years in the waiting to get image of this one! Just when i’ve given up looking out for it and put away my camera it lands a mere one metre infront of me completly ignoring my presence flapping it’s fabulously long white tail (some 30cm or so) and takes it’s time preening itself turning its body back and forth!

Off for my camera and its gone..

Love the way it’s tail follows it, flowing in a wave like manner.

Proop, proop, prooop

With their distinct light blue underbellies

Making loads of proop, proop sounds as they swarm an area

These annually migrating birds move in flocks from Europe and asia and are here on their way down to southern Africa and are known as ‘Eurasian Bee Eaters’.

Looking at their size and thinking of the journey they make annually gets me asking – if this small creation has the courage to cross oceans, desert’s and seas on its small wings ‘What does that say about a people that have Never visited the village next door’?

Awesome spider in kilome

African Black  Eagles of Kilome

souring over us probably looking out for ‘hyrax’ which we had just seen sunbathing, it soon attracts the attention of other birds of prey(raptors) in the vicinity. An alarm call is sounded by one and they all come together – buzzards and falcons.

The Black Eagle quickly makes a turn, flapping its wide wings (about 2 meters wide) and heads straight into its adversaries. They quickly scatter as it takes advantage to disappear over the hills with the other raptors in hot pursuit…

*watch a 3 minute BBC clip how this birds hunt: 

Ostrich farming for Kilome (part 1) 

What is an Ostrich?

  •  Largest But flightless bird
  •  Life span: 30 to 70years
  •  70-100 eggs per year
  •  Reproduction Age: 42years
  •  Temperature tolerance: -30C to +56C
  •  Hieght 8-9 ft
  •  100 Kg weight in 10months
  •  Running speed 70

The Ostrich producer ranking?

  • South Africa
  • China (Still buying breeding stock!)
  • Israel
  • Iran
  • Australia
  • USA, Mexico, Japan,
  • Malaysia,Croatia,Philippines,
  • Thailand, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait,
  • Egypt,Brazil, United Arab Emirates,
  • Turkey, Pakistan, India

 IRAN

  • Iran rears and slaughters
  • 150,000 + birds per year
  • Direct government support
  • State Sponsored Breeding Farms
  • Claims to be third largest  Ostrich farmer


China

  • Ostrich Boom in last 9 years
  • Had ostrich farming in over 30 provinces seven years back
  • Massive local consumption potential
  • Has now started export of Ostrich Meat and Products



Ostrich can feed the world?

  •  Best FCR
  •  18kg – 24kg (8 weeks)
  •  45kg – 80 kg (16 weeks)
  •  70kg – 170 kg (26 weeks)
  •  100 kg – 400 kg (42 weeks)
  •  Healthy and organic meat
  •  Multiplication
  •  min 30 chicks/hen/year
  •  Can generate PKR 100,000/hen
  •  Highly Profitable Business
  •  POC Support
  •  Low Space/ Food requirement
  •  Premium for Early movers
  •  More profitable than cattle, goat and poultry

Why Ostrich Farming

  • Natural Environment is Ukambani
  •  Agricultural Country
  •  Livestock
  •  Meat as Prime Food Source
  •  Cheaper Labour
  •  Low feed cost
  •  Little or no handling
  •  Feed to Weight Ratio
  •  Product Variety
  •  Leather Industry
  •  High Profitability
  •  Adaptability (Ukambani natural habitat)
  •  Success in entire World

(*source: Pakistan Ostrich Farming)

There are 4 clearly identifiable phases that the industry has passed. 

Phase 1: Initial Development of Industries with full infrastructure 

This phase includes countries that had full infrastructure for production, processing and marketing with commercial scale capacity. Countries included here are South Africa, Israel, Zimbabwe and Namibia. Israels entry into the industry was the first outside South Africa in modern times. During this period Zimbabwe and Namibia were also exporting eggs, chicks and breeder birds to support the development discussed in Phase 2. Eggs, chicks and adult birds were also exported from Tanzania and Kenya. 

Figure 2 – Namibian Community Farmers 

Phase 2: The first countries importing foundation stock outside Southern Africa and Israel 

This phase includes the first countries to import foundation stock from their original countries, which included stock taken from the wild. Countries included in this group are USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, UK and Northern Continental European countries such as The Netherlands, Denmark, Germany and France. Other importers of stock during this phase were China, Japan, Malaysia, Thailand and Philippines. These countries imported a diversity of genetics not only from Namibia, Bophuthatswana and Zimbabwe but also from Tanzania and Kenya. South Africa was unable to export fertile eggs and live birds until 1998. However, there were many reports of illegal exports from South Africa, prior to the change in legislation. During this period it was impossible to identify the genetic origin of the birds. 

Phase 3: Phase 2 countries selling to more countries new to ostrich 

The countries listed in Phase 2 failed to successfully move from importation of foundation stock to commercial production. As a result they sold their stock onto new countries and accompanied by the same errors in production advice. The first recipient countries were Spain, Portugal, Italy and Greece in Europe and then onto Brazil and Argentina. Stock from these areas also moved into Eastern Europe and the Middle East. At the same time stock moved to Mexico, Peru, Colombia, Venezuela and Chile. Nowadays stock is moving into Nigeria and other North African countries, Pakistan and other areas still working to establish commercial poultry production.

Phase 4: Industry in Contraction 

Obtaining accurate production data is challenging, but a review of the last meaningful table published illustrates why this is. As at 2012 the industry is in a poor situation, with limited, if any slaughter activity in most areas. Several hundred birds per annum at the most in some locations. What about the Phase 1 countries? 

There are still some birds slaughtered in South Africa  probably around the 100,000 level per annum – as slaughter numbers have reduced steadily over the past 10 years. There are a number of reasons for this. One is several outbreaks of Avian Influenza that have resulted in the inability to export meat, which is a major source of revenue. The South African producers have failed to modernise their production systems with the result that they have failed to reduce their costs of production. This results in uncompetitive meat production when measured against the costs of mainstream meat products. The ostrich leather market virtually collapsed in recent years as a result of the inconsistencies in quality and supply from all sources. 

The political situation in Zimbabwe has prevented Zimbabwes production from developing its potential. Israels production failed when there was an outbreak of avian influenza in their poultry flocks preventing them from exporting their meat. Their industry had no local meat consumption as ostrich is not kosher, but ostrich is acceptable to consumers who require Halaal certification. 

 Time now to capitalise on lessons learnt 

At this point in time (2012) it is necessary to observe the development of the established commercial meat production species: pig, poultry (mainly chicken but with turkey, duck, guinea fowl and other poultry becoming players), along with cattle, sheep and goat as the mainstream current competition to ostrich meat. Not only does ostrich have to compete for shelf space in super markets for mainstream meat types but also other speciality meat types such as venison, emu, wild boar, kangaroo, rabbit and crocodile. 

The important factor in favour of ostrich is their ability to produce meat protein at similar feed efficiencies and therefore cost as pig and poultry. South Africa, the dominant producer of ostrich, remains working with outdated systems that continue to fail their producers. These outdated systems were passed onto the new developing countries. 

Over the past few decades, pig and poultry production has become extremely efficient in their production methods. For example in broiler production the growing chick spends 25% less time on the farm to reach the same weight than it did 25 years ago. In the same 25 years ostrich has gone through these various phases. 
These 25 years have provided the opportunity to gain experience and prove the potential that under the right management systems, ostrich can reach the same slaughter weight in less than ½ the accepted time. It now requires adoption of the knowledge learnt and implemented on a large enough scale to ensure it is commercially viable before it is too late.

Gooood Morning!

Wild primates Life Kilome ©muokikioko 2016

Boxing spiders of Kilome

©muoki kioko 2016

Armed with ‘black gloves’, protecting their bloodshot Red eyes are these ‘boxing spiders’ in kilome.

At home both on surfaces or as they glide ‘still’ on water surfaces – looking always ready to throw in a fewww punches on anything in their way. 

Armed with a front set of 4 Eyes and another two smaller eyes on the side, they are unalarmed at bigger objects in front of them like YoU!

*ID’d by Zarek Cocker as a ‘Salticidae – jumping spider’

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