Archive for the ‘ muoki ’ Category

Mauritian Tomb Bats in Kilome

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Mauritian Tomb Bat Kilome ©muokikioko'16

Mauritian Tomb Bat (Taphozous
mauritianus) that hangs upside down on surfaces seemingly ever alert and awake during the day suggesting it has a good eyesight.
Avoiding dark areas and instead opting for open spaces that allow it easy take-off, it can now be seen in Kilome.
Thought to exist only below 1000m, it’s resident above 1200m above sea level here.
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photos and text
©muoki kioko
2009-2016
email:muokikioko@gmail.com

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Fun in kilome

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River walks

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Relaxation sites

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Nature

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Sampling local foods

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and culture

Text & Images
©Muoki Kioko 2009-2014
email: muokikioko@gmail.com
All rights reserved.

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Signage from Kilome

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From ‘to let’ signs, to

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Room names. 

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Or all weather reflective corridor signs for toilets from 200 bob($3). Coming with options of door stick on or screw on.
These are the changing faces of rural Africa!
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This pair with door stick on’s for washrooms/toilets is Ksh150 this week.

You can make your orders using email: kilomeinvestments@gmail.com

Text & Images
©Muoki Kioko 2009-2014
email: muokikioko@gmail.com
All rights reserved.

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Salama Sunset

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Looking out towards Salama and into masailand at sunset are these gradient landscapes as the sun sets.

Copyright Reserved
All images and Text
Muokisphotography@yahoo.com
2009 – 2014
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Mango trees that produce 2 species in Kilome

As you can see the mangoes on the right are more rounded than the left, while those on left side are green skinned while those on right are reddish skinned!

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Slicing up the fruit reveals a fleshy juicy fruit with the legendary ukambani sweetness!

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In Kilome there are 5(five) mango species locally known as
1- ndii
2- ndungu luma
3- munavu/kutu wa ingoi
4- ndoto
5- kasukali
..and they ripen in that sequence between Months of December to March
However the fruit sizes are normally small to medium, with the sweetest [Kasukali ie ‘ka sugar’] having a large seed and little flesh.
So how are these farmers managing 2 or 3 species on one tree as seen in this shop table?

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(Visible between/behind the carrots and mangoes is the normal size small mango fruit.)

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The traditional mango trees that spread their branches wide out are being trimmed

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and where the branches are trimmed new shoots sprout which are then grafted as below

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*What potential does this hold for agro farming, commercial fruit production, fruit juices & jams industry, agro tourism and agro education?

Text & Images
©Muoki Kioko 2009-2013
For permissions to use images email: muokisphotography@yahoo.com

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Woodcraft Curtillary in Kilome

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These are the popular items amoung local homes made by this gentleman, but his range is wide! He also serves export markets, and as you can see he’s a cheerful person to be around!
More: kilomeinvestments@gmail.com

Text & Images
©Muoki Kioko 2009-2012

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The Kenze Experience

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Wow! is more like how to describe Kenze, although it doesn’t do it enough justice. Put on your headphones and listen to this . Now add a feeling of space and stability ALL around you, then a birds eye view of a waterfall on one side, a valley that stretches to the horizon on another and a myrid of hill types on another.

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Take a break at what looks like a once open ampitheatre facing a full view of Kiima kiu.

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Ask yourself why someone had built a house at the center of a forest very far away from everyone else.

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Lastly visit hyena caves, some of which stretch over 20metres deep. When you run out of daylight let the local guides remind you you didn’t visit (*I’ll put up picture in follow up article)

Text & Images
©Muoki Kioko 2009-2012

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