Archive for the ‘ Uncategorized ’ Category

Kili view from kilome

Kilimanjaro from kilome ©muokikioko 2017

Advertisements

Is Kilome being turned into a concrete jungle?

Konza farm and it’s neighbouring society farms have been divided into 7-10acre and commercial plots. That’s Machakos to almost Sultan hamud approximately 70 kms of planned housing (ie consumption of stone,cement and sand! ). What value does ALL this consumption add to the region? Cement makes 2 or 3 firms richer, while sand is exploitative destroying local river beds while living local youth poor and bitter.
This area is rich in natural plains wildlife (natural resource) that requires little investment compared to housing and nature maintains itself. Why replace what is natural and free with concrete? What economic sense is there in all this?
Lets look at Business Outsourcing through IT on which the planned City is based on. Outsourcing comes down to 2 things – Reliability/Dependability and Cost. Reliability is dependant on Integrity and internalised structures, while cost is dependant on availability of iT hardware/software, power costs and reliable competitively cheap connectivity to internet.
All smart phones, ipads, etc are mobile computers with internal modems ie computers are down to 8000/= to 100,000 dependent on internal processing power. That means with an Ideos I have both hardware and software in my pocket ALL the time. All I need is connectivity which I get as long as telephone networks are available. I I’m then be able to work wherever I want – on the roadside, in bed, under a tree, hut,Turkana… at this point my only huddle is power to charge my garget. Option is solar or cheap electricity both of which are NOT dependent on a city’s availability. Structures are dependant on systems set up for delivery mainly done by companies. They may need a building but those working for them need not be physically available thus reducing costs to the business owner and small offices are thus required. This may explain why ALL ICT cities are sparsely populated (ref; TV images) – unlike the ‘Artists Impressions of our city!
The last component connecting them is internet connectivity, it’s reliability and costs.
Now this is where NO single person has said anything meaningful. What are our(KENYA’s) country’s costs compared to ALL other countries worldwide providing outsourcing services – connectivity, labour, electricity and integrity?

Let’s look at housing:
Where will all these people to live in this housing work if the IT offices need not be big? Where is the infrustructure to support ALL this housing – sewage, water, electricity, roads, …other than that provided for in Konzacity masterplan for the city ONLY! How many of these Kenyans will get contracts and jobs to build this infrustructure? Are we able to even provide the same for the small towns around this area that already exist? Salama town  that sits on the main water pipeline to supply ukambani piped water has water availability issues.
The other talk I hear on TV is that it provides an opportunity to  correct low cost housing in Nairobi as Kibera costs about 800 million an acre. Kibera exists due to an economic reality – cheap labour for our local industries in Nairobi. We will provide cheap rail transport – a rail line runs through kibera, but for the employment to make economic sense to the workers they seek residences from which they can WALK to and from to access jobs. Will they walk from Konza or pay for a 40+ km journey if they can’t afford to pay for a 4km journey?
Can someone place on the table the ACTUAL Environmental Impact Assessment  done for turning this zone into a concrete jungle!
Clearly this whole plan is informed by ‘A Land Speculator’ who’s asking  people to gamble so that he/she will make money immediately irrespective of the mess they leave behind or economic losses that result from housing without businesses to sustain their occupation locally(or can someone show me the activity locally that will provide jobs to pay for this housing, in turn pay loans taken to buy the land and build the houses).
This zone is rich in Kongoni Antelope(HarteBeest) visible even from mombasa road. Walk along Koinange street or Muindi mbingu street in Nairobi and ask ANY tour driver parked there, the only other two zones known for such Kongoni numbers are Mara and Samburu each 200+ kms away. These same plains have been in International news recently for a ‘Spottless Cheetah’ a very rare phenomenon last recorded 100+years ago(ref link). Cheetahs depend on open plains game.

Text & Images
©Muoki Kioko 2009-2012

Subscribe at the bottom of this page to receive email notifications of new articles

Wildlife Park in Kilome

Located just 60kms on the Nairobi-Mombasa highway, directly opposite the proposed ICT city. Easily identified by this small cornical hill

image

that always has wildlife visible even from the main road

Set to become the worlds 2nd Wildlife park next to a metropolitan City but owned by Konza Ranch as a prosperity for the families of ranch members.
They will be tapping into Corporate guests from Konzacity, international guests using Mombasa highway going to far flung parks like Tsavo.
A 6 star premium lodge set for the hill top(owned by konza ranch) will be leased out to earn members dividends. Camping and picnic sites will be marked for extra revenue.
A Kamba cultural center is also envisioned where the community will showcase their culture complete with ‘a traditional Kamba village’ as well as providing them with a place to sell local craft made by Kenya’s most skilled curvers and weavers – The Akamba!
Tapping into domestic tourism for day to day income revenues from schools coming to see impala, eland, ostriches,… campers paying 200/= per head per night and park entrance fee being premium $70+(approx ksh 6500/=) per foreign guest per day entry. It will complement Konza city as it enhances the environment of the planned buffer zone, while giving room for others with land parcels boardering to join in creating a ‘green zone’ where they can earn $’s from Carbon Points.

Text & Images
©Muoki Kioko 2009-2012

Subscribe at the bottom of this page to receive email notifications of new articles

Kukumanga(Kamba), Dhalum(swahili) in Kilome

Over the last 20+ years, I kept hearing of ‘kukumanga’ fruit as a high sexual stimulant especially amongst the Akamba community. I’ve finally come accross it in Kilome hill’s. Does it work? Let our sisters of central province tell us after giving their unperforming husbands(sic). Meanwhile the Kamba’s are said to know their duty[lol:)] One glass of it’s juice is said to cost 200/=

kukumanga, fruit of asia, five fruits of israel, medicine, tannin, elite fruit

kukumanga, fruit of asia, five fruits of israel, medicine, tannin, elite fruit

image[/caption]

Introduced to Kilome by Missionaries who set up Kenya’s first missionary center there. Parents plant it(sic) and happily feed their children with it, women are all too happy selling them to children. One father forbed me touching any of the bushes(trees) near my place saying his daughter eats the fruit! (I thought I was clearing a thorny bush).

kukumanga in the market

kukumanga in the market

image[/caption]

Promagranate/Pomegranet – from pomme garnete ie “seeded apple” or chinease apple”
Thought to be the forbidden fruit in the Garden of Eden for the obvious results(above or ref: –more detail here). It’s origins traced to Asia (Himalayas to Iran) and considered as one of the ‘fruits of Israel’. Featured in Old testament (Deut 8: 6-8)and Egyptian Mythology. Carried accross deserts for it’s thirst quenching Juice.
uses:Eaten or drank as juice fresh, used for making jellies, in cold & hot sauces or to flavor cakes. Syrup sold as grenadine(commercially), juice also made into wine and fruit used as a decorate in fruit baskets amoungst the elite.

Medical uses: juice yields citric acid & sodium citrate used for pharmacetical purposes. Juice also considered beneficial in cases of leprosy. Bark & roots contain alkaloids like iso pelletierine that are active against tapeworms(overdose known to produce muscular weaknesses). Bark, leaves, immature fruit & fruit rind given as astringents to halt diarrhea, dysentery and hemorrhages.
Other uses: Both tree and root barks contain 10-28 percent tannin content that’s used in leather tannin. Rind and flowers yield dyes for textiles, while the straight stems are hardwoods used in the making of walking sticks and crafts.

Other names:
Sanskrit – dadima, dalim
Persian – dalim
French – Grenade
Italian – melograno
Thailand – tab tim

Text & Images
©Muoki Kioko 2009-2012

Subscribe at the bottom of this page to receive email notifications of new articles

Basket weavers in Kilome

image

To order custom made colors or designs +254727844815

Text & Images
©Muoki Kioko 2009-2012

Subscribe at the bottom of this page to receive email notifications of new articles

168th Bird Species recorded in Kilome

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

Terrestrial Brownbul became Kilome’s 168 bird species siting. Seen in the images above is the Terrestrial Brownbul, purple grenadier, bare eyed thrush, common bulbul, the Red-cheeked Cordon Bleu, yellow fronted canary and black faced waxbill

*now 170 species

*All images are subject to copyright laws & lawsuits under the new international copyright laws!

Text & Images
©Muoki Kioko 2009-2012

Subscribe at the bottom of this page to receive email notifications of new articles

Acre’s of Diamonds in Kilome

When going down the Tigris and
Euphrates rivers many years ago with a party of English travelers I found myself under the direction of an old Arab guide whom we hired up at Baghdad, and I have often thought how that guide resembled our
barbers in certain mental
characteristics. He thought that it was not only his duty to guide us down those rivers, and do what he was paid for doing, but to entertain us with stories curious and weird, ancient and modern strange, and familiar. Many of them I have forgotten, and I am glad I have, but there is one I shall never forget.
The old guide was leading my camel by its halter along the banks of those ancient rivers, and he told me story after story until I grew weary of his story-telling and ceased to listen. I have never been irritated with that guide when he lost his temper as I ceased listening. But I remember that he took off his Turkish cap and swung it in a circle to get my attention. I could see it through the corner of my eye, but I determined not to look straight at him for fear he would tell another story. But although I am not a woman, I did finally look, and as soon as I did he went right into another story. Said he, “I will tell you a story now which I reserve for my particular friends.” When he
emphasized the words “particular friends,” I listened and I have ever been glad I did. I really feel devoutly thankful, that there are 1,674 young men who have been carried through college by this lecture who are also glad that I did listen.
The old guide told me that there once lived not far from the River Indus an ancient Persian by the name of Ali Hafed. He said that Ali Hafed owned a very large farm; that he had orchards, grain-fields, and gardens; that he had money at interest and was a wealthy and contented man. One day there visited that old Persian farmer one of those ancient Buddhist priests, one of the wise men of the East. He sat down by the fire and told the old farmer how this old world of ours was made.
He said that this world was once a mere bank of fog, and that the Almighty thrust His finger into this bank of fog, and began slowly to move His finger around, increasing the speed until at last He whirled this bank of fog into a solid ball of fire. Then it went rolling through the universe, burning its way through other banks of fog, and condensed the moisture without, until it fell in floods of rain upon its hot surface, and cooled the outward crust. Then the internal fires bursting outward through the crust threw up the mountains and hills, the valleys, the plains and prairies of this wonderful world of ours. If this internal molten mass came bursting out and cooled very quickly, it became granite; less quickly copper, less quickly silver, less quickly gold, and, after gold, diamonds were made. Said the old priest, “A diamond is a congealed drop of sunlight.” Now that is literally scientifically true, that a diamond is an actual deposit of carbon from the sun. The old priest told Ali Hafed that if he had one diamond the size of his thumb he could purchase the county, and if he had a mine of diamonds he could place his children upon thrones through the influence of their great wealth. Ali Hafed heard all about diamonds, how much they were
worth, and went to his bed that night a poor man. He had not lost anything, but he was poor because he was discontented, and discontented
because he feared he was poor. He said, “I want a mine of diamonds,” and he lay awake all night. Early in the morning he sought out the priest. I know by experience that a priest is very cross when awakened early in the morning, and when he shook that old priest out of his dreams, Ali Hafed said to him: “Will you tell me where I find
diamonds?” “Diamonds! What do you want with diamonds?”
“Why, I wish to be immensely rich.”
“Well, then, go along and find them. That is all you have to do; go and find them, and then you have them.”
“But I don’t know where to go.”
“Well, if you will find a river that runs through white sands, between high mountains, in those white sands you will always find diamonds.”
“I don’t believe there is any such river.”
“Oh yes, there are plenty of them. All you have to do is to go and find them, and then you have them.”
Said Ali Hafed, “I will go.”
So he sold his farm, collected his money, left his family in charge of a neighbor, and away he went in search of diamonds. He began his search, very properly to my mind, at the Mountains of the Moon. Afterward he came around into Palestine, then wandered on into Europe, and at last when his money was all spent and he was in rags, wretchedness, and
poverty, he stood on the shore of that bay at Barcelona, in Spain, when a great tidal wave came rolling in between the pillars of Hercules, and the poor, afflicted, suffering, dying man could not resist the awful temptation to cast himself into that incoming tide, and he sank beneath its foaming crest, never to rise in this life again.
Then after that old guide had told me that awfully sad story, he stopped the camel I was riding on and went back to fix the baggage that was coming off another camel, and I had an opportunity to muse over his story while he was gone. I remember saying to myself, “Why did he reserve that story for his ‘particular friends’?”
There seemed to be no beginning, no middle, no end, nothing to it.
That was the first story I had ever heard told in my life, and would be the first one I ever read, in which the hero was killed in the first chapter. I had but one chapter of that story, and the hero was dead. When the guide came back and took up the halter of my camel, he went right ahead with the story, into the second chapter, just as though there had been no break.
The man who purchased Ali Hafed’s farm one day led his camel into the garden to drink, and as that camel put its nose into the shallow water of that garden brook, Ali Hafed’s successor noticed a curious flash of light from the white sands of the stream. He pulled out a black stone having an eye of light reflecting all the hues of the rainbow. He took the pebble into the house and put it on the mantel which covers the central fires, and forgot all about it.
A few days later this same old priest came in to visit Ali Hafed’s successor, and the moment he opened that drawing-room door he saw that flash of light on the mantel, and he rushed up to it, and shouted:
“Here is a diamond! Has Ali Hafed returned?”
“Oh no, Ali Hafed has not returned, and that is not a diamond. That is nothing but a stone we found right out here in our own garden.”
“But,” said the priest, “I tell you I know a diamond when I see it. I know positively that is a diamond.”
Then together they rushed out into that old garden and stirred up the white sands with their fingers, and lo! There came up other more beautiful and valuable gems then the first. “Thus,” said the guide to me, “was discovered the diamond-mine of Golconda, the most magnificent
diamond-mine in all the history of mankind, excelling the Kimberly itself. The Kohinoor, and the Orloff of the crown jewels of England and Russia, the largest on earth, came from that mine.”
When that old Arab guide told me the second chapter of his story, he then took off his Turkish cap and swung it around in the air again to get my attention to the moral. Those Arab guides have morals to their stories, although they are not always moral.
As he swung his hat, he said to me, “Had Ali Hafed remained at home and dug in his own cellar, or underneath his own wheat fields or in his own garden, instead of wretchedness, starvation, and death by suicide in a strange land, he would have had ‘acres of diamonds.’ For every acre of that old farm, yes, every shovelful, afterward revealed gems which since have decorated the crowns of
monarchs.”
When he had added the moral of his story I saw why he reserved it for “his particular friends.” But I did not tell him that I could see it. It was that mean old Arab’s way of going around a thing like a lawyer, to say indirectly what he did not dare say directly, that “in his private opinion there was a certain young man then traveling down the Tigris River that might better be at home in America.” I did not tell him I could see that, but I told it to him quick, and I think I will tell it to you.
*Do you know people living wretched life’s in cities or foreign lands, where as they left diamonds at home (Kilome)?

Text & Images
©Muoki Kioko 2009-2012

Subscribe at the bottom of this page to receive email notifications of new articles

%d bloggers like this: