Posts Tagged ‘ foods ’

kilome Avocadoes

Can be served with slices of bread as a snack

or Served – ‘Hot n Sweat’

to thrill your tongue..

​the only thing local parents/traders warrat you, is..

Nzumbula/’Mukwaju’ (Tamarind)

Tamarind cultivation is nearly comparable with mango cultivation. Tamarind is a drought resistant tree, if grafted seedlings are planted can yield within 5years.
You can plant 7m X 7m distance. In this pattern, u can accommodate 204 plants in an hectare (around 80 plants in an acre)

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THE TAMARIND (Tamarindus indica) is a hardy tree well adapted to the semi-arid tropics.
This economically important tree is ideal for farm-forestry in the drought-prone regions. It is popularly referred to as indian dates.
The tamarind tree can serve as an
insurance crop and a “pension crop” for the farmers in the dry belts.
The time for a tamarind tree to reach its first harvest will vary, depending on the method of propagation.
A tree propagated by bud-grafting will come into bearing in 3 to 4 years, whereas trees propagated by seed may take up to 12 years. Practical management and local conditions will also affect the time for trees to bear. A well tended tree, grown from seed, in an open area will come into bearing in about 7years. Regardless of the method of propagation, pod yield should stabilise after 15 years.

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The tree has a pod bearing capacity of 50-60 years, but may yield fruit for over 200 years.
Fruit ripeness and yield Pod skin colour does not change rapidly with maturity and individual fruits mature at different times, so harvesting should be carried out
selectively. Mature fruits should have a brown shell, while immature pods have a green skin.
At maturity, the fruits are filled with a sticky brown to reddish-brown pulp and the seeds become hard and glossy.

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The pod skin becomes brittle as the pulp shrinks and the shell can be broken easily by hand. The ripe pod produces a hollow sound when tapped with the finger.
The yield of a tamarind tree varies
considerably and is dependent on genetic and environmental factors. Pod yield can also be cyclic, with bumper yields in every third year. A young tree may yield 20-30kg of fruit per tree in a year and a full-grown adult tree can yield about 150-200kg of fruit per tree in a year. An average tamarind tree may yield 100kg of fruit per tree in a year.

photos and text
©muoki kioko
2009-2015
email:muokikioko@gmail.com

Cassava Value Addition [Final part]

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Highly productive under marginal climates and soil conditions like most semi arid regions of Kenya like Kilome in Makueni county resulting in low costs of production.
This last section of cassava value addition takes a broader part by part view of the crops value addition and possible simple ways to get it to those stages in rural/”under developed” areas

*It’s important to take note that any item you prepare for Humans whether for their direct consumption or for use in their environs ‘You’ take responsibility of their safety as you would when exposing your own child. Every country has it’s guidelines on the same.

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Every part of cassava has use (both those above ground & those in the soil).

ABOVE GROUND

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Leaves are edible both by man

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and as animal feed for goats & chicken.
Stems are dried & chipped to make chip boards for ceilings, table tops, etc

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All images and Text
Muokikioko@gmail.com
2009 – 2016
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Cassava crunchies in Kilome – value addition part3

Orange cassava crunchies
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Cassava ovacado bite

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Cassava onion bite
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Cassava tomato crunchy

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All images and Text
Muokikioko@gmail.com
2009 – 2014
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Eating in Kilome – cassava meals

a ‘hot/chillied’ dry Meat & Cassava meal cooked with sweet potato/pumpkin leaves

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Mukeu, taken with mala (home made not packet)

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…a local pumpkin and cassava dish

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Cassava flavoured in vegetables prepared with fresh cow milk that gives it a ghee/cheese scent

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Cassava mchicha topped with macadamia nuts

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All images and Text
Muokisphotography@yahoo.com
2009 – 2014
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Cassava – value addition in Kilome (part 1)

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A tuber crop that does very well in Ukambani. I’ve seen 6/7kg tubers in kilome. Normally eaten raw, its quite filling and cheap when compared to breads. There are individuals already turning it to powder(we’ll look at that in part two)
Today we look at Cassava Crisps

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Made by peeling outer cover then sliced using this slicer

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(that costs about 80bob in local supermarkets) cutting the cassava into small “thin” slices

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Which you then dip into hot oil till edges get brown.  You can then drain or dry the fat/oil by placing the cooked crisps on tissue. Salt to taste and even add a drop or two of chilly for that mild sting.
Verdict: superb crunch to be used with tea, soda, juice or any other drink.
Cassava Chips:

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Tired of chips that dont fill your tummy? Try cassava chips! Cut cassava into rings then slice into chips as above. Dip chips into hot oil till they get light brown edges then remove and salt.

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A good filling snack!

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Muokis Tea  Crunchies: made as above, just remember to remove them from oil immediately they start getting light brown outeredges. This is a filler!!!
*adding a drop or two of fresh lime/lemon over these snacks to give them a bonus taste 🙂

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Muokisphotography@yahoo.com
2009 – 2014
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Foods in Kilome – Okra

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..at times known as Ladies fingers. Planted mainly for exporters as people don’t fancy it’s waterish nature when cooked like a stew. But thanks to resident chefs here’s a very crunchy and juicy way its prepared in kilome [a bite gives you that crunchy dry taste just before a juice pours onto your tongue]

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Roll the washed okra in a mixture of maize flour with little chilli (above sample had spice added)

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Fry in shallow hot oil

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Serve with rice and gently heated onion and tomatoes {all from local farms} plus local vegetables

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Alternatively used to spice up locally available butter beans and used with fresh tomatoes.

Copyright Reserved
All images and Text
Muokisphotography@yahoo.com
2009 – 2014
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