Inside kilome: The Art of digging up cassava

image

Don’t dig up that way, you’ll spoil the harvest!
Cassava harvesting is a skill. Starting from how to identify if it has a ready tuber for harvesting to which direction it runs and finally remembering it’s part of a root system that intertwines – how do I dig it up without damaging the other growing roots!
At times the root you require is growing downwards or under roots not fully developed, how do you harvest this root without damaging the younger roots?

This month visit and learn this cassava skill passed down generations in a cultural experience

photos and text
©muoki kioko
2009-2015
email:muokikioko@gmail.com

Paper wasps of Kilome

image

Paper wasp©muoki kioko

I had always thought of the power drill used for making holes on walls or a dentist drill for teeth as a brilliant innovation. Same to the banking process of keeping valuables in a vault, that was until this

image

wasp turned up. Bzzzzz, bzzzzz, bzzzzzz zzzzzz zzzzzzz it went on constantly turning around its tunnel to ensure the edges were smoothed out.
Next, out it went and in a short while returned with cargo which it safely deposited in this vault

image

Paper wasp2© Muoki Kioko

Then… the vault is secured! different sized materials are tried for a tight ‘fit’ in the tunnel

image

After fitting a 2nd or 3rd layer is added before surface is evened out and made to look like the surrounding.
Noticed that later in the day, if it acquired new cargo the old vault could still be traced accurately and the vault secured even more.
Just left wondering what other lessons were can pick from the creator of the universe.

Conferencing in Kilome

image

Need  for conferencing within one hour of Nairobi’s – Jomo Kenyatta International Airport, but out of the City?
Kilome  offers a number of conferencing opportunities from small groups to groups of upto 100.
Amoung them is this one who’s gardens offer opportunities to view Kilimanjaro in the evenings and early mornings.
To book  +254717950722

Activities while here include swimming,, hiking, cultural visits, ..
see:
https://kilome.wordpress.com/tourism/

Text & Images
©Muoki Kioko 2009-2015
email: muokikioko@gmail.com
All rights reserved.

Subscribe at the bottom of this page to receive email notifications of New Posts.

‘Woof’ spiders of kilome

image

‘Woof’ is the name I’ve given this spider because of it’s dog like features. It is part of a collection of spiders I’ve captured that have features similar to objects or animals we are familiar with.
The other very interesting one was one with a cat like face, which i could not trace at the time of this upload. All in all i appreciate if any of you know its scientific name for Id’ing purposes

Text & Images
©Muoki Kioko 2009-2015
email: muokikioko@gmail.com
All rights reserved.

Subscribe at the bottom of this page to receive email notifications of New Posts.

Inside Kilome – Mwambwani shrines

Standing at 5934 feet above sea level are these UKambani shrines

image

Entry is best through Sultan Hamud on mombasa road. An alternative is through Nunguni at the top of kilome hills that’s ALL tarmac from Nairobi some about 125kms. Turn off to Nunguni from Mombasa road is at 100kms, where you turn left for remaining 25kms of tarmac. Thereafter seek local directions from closest Government office or book a local guide who will also explain how the shrines were used.

Text & Images
©Muoki Kioko 2009-2015
email: muokikioko@gmail.com
All rights reserved.

Subscribe at the bottom of this page to receive email notifications of New Posts.

African Dog Species

image

Did you know that Africa has indigenous dog species, some of which are internationally known and highly valuable?
So what makes a dog species valuable?
First is it’s temperament around the home, how good is it around children? some dogs don’t like being touched! A good example are the short ‘basengi/basenji’ dogs that don’t like being touched, but are very loyal to their masters. They will stick by their master, but tend to sit away from him/her waiting for commands while the other dogs sit next to their masters. They are also very cooperative with other dogs.
The other is that each type / species has it’s character that is usefull. Though it (basengi) doesn’t like being touched, it doesn’t appreciate strangers in it’s territory – thus making it a very good gaurd dog as it won’t entertain a stranger in it’s owners compound. However, it has another interesting character on farms – it’s an egg thief :)
Other dogs are good for hunting, while others are good at initiating play amoungst other dogs and children. Others are excellent herders and are traditionally used to herd sheep in Northern Africa.
There’s one dog type found here in kilome I’ve not been able to identify. Anyone who knows what species it is can let us know. It’s color reminds one of a hyena.

image

I’ve also noticed its the most alert in terms of anything unusual happening in neighborhood and tends to alert other dogs to check out what’s happening. I’ve also never seen it pack with other dogs when damsels are on heat.
Pure breed dogs are valuable in markets with prices starting about Ksh 20,000 ($250) a pup here in East Africa. To be certified pure breed it needs to have identifiable records of about 4 generations of it’s parents (same species) and fully vaccinated. In East Africa there’s a Kennel club that keeps records of certified dogs [The East African Kennel Club]

To learn more on the popular 9 African species that are internationally known (click Here)

Here’s where the Dog business gets interesting and super valuable!
“The more you selectively breed a breed for a character that the market requires, the more valuable your dog breed/hood becomes”

Read about Hip, Eye & DNA scoring done on registered dogs
http://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/services/public/glossary/health-tests.aspx

Text & Images
©Muoki Kioko 2009-2015
email: muokikioko@gmail.com
All rights reserved.

Subscribe at the bottom of this page to receive email notifications of New Posts.

Giraffes crossing Highway near Konza

image

Text & Images
©Muoki Kioko 2009-2015
email: muokikioko@gmail.com
All rights reserved.

Subscribe at the bottom of this page to receive email notifications of New Posts.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 440 other followers

%d bloggers like this: