Archive for the ‘ Investments ’ Category

kilome Avocadoes

Can be served with slices of bread as a snack

or Served – ‘Hot n Sweat’

to thrill your tongue..

​the only thing local parents/traders warrat you, is..

Ostrich farming for Kilome (part 1) 

What is an Ostrich?

  •  Largest But flightless bird
  •  Life span: 30 to 70years
  •  70-100 eggs per year
  •  Reproduction Age: 42years
  •  Temperature tolerance: -30C to +56C
  •  Hieght 8-9 ft
  •  100 Kg weight in 10months
  •  Running speed 70

The Ostrich producer ranking?

  • South Africa
  • China (Still buying breeding stock!)
  • Israel
  • Iran
  • Australia
  • USA, Mexico, Japan,
  • Malaysia,Croatia,Philippines,
  • Thailand, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait,
  • Egypt,Brazil, United Arab Emirates,
  • Turkey, Pakistan, India

 IRAN

  • Iran rears and slaughters
  • 150,000 + birds per year
  • Direct government support
  • State Sponsored Breeding Farms
  • Claims to be third largest  Ostrich farmer


China

  • Ostrich Boom in last 9 years
  • Had ostrich farming in over 30 provinces seven years back
  • Massive local consumption potential
  • Has now started export of Ostrich Meat and Products



Ostrich can feed the world?

  •  Best FCR
  •  18kg – 24kg (8 weeks)
  •  45kg – 80 kg (16 weeks)
  •  70kg – 170 kg (26 weeks)
  •  100 kg – 400 kg (42 weeks)
  •  Healthy and organic meat
  •  Multiplication
  •  min 30 chicks/hen/year
  •  Can generate PKR 100,000/hen
  •  Highly Profitable Business
  •  POC Support
  •  Low Space/ Food requirement
  •  Premium for Early movers
  •  More profitable than cattle, goat and poultry

Why Ostrich Farming

  • Natural Environment is Ukambani
  •  Agricultural Country
  •  Livestock
  •  Meat as Prime Food Source
  •  Cheaper Labour
  •  Low feed cost
  •  Little or no handling
  •  Feed to Weight Ratio
  •  Product Variety
  •  Leather Industry
  •  High Profitability
  •  Adaptability (Ukambani natural habitat)
  •  Success in entire World

(*source: Pakistan Ostrich Farming)

There are 4 clearly identifiable phases that the industry has passed. 

Phase 1: Initial Development of Industries with full infrastructure 

This phase includes countries that had full infrastructure for production, processing and marketing with commercial scale capacity. Countries included here are South Africa, Israel, Zimbabwe and Namibia. Israels entry into the industry was the first outside South Africa in modern times. During this period Zimbabwe and Namibia were also exporting eggs, chicks and breeder birds to support the development discussed in Phase 2. Eggs, chicks and adult birds were also exported from Tanzania and Kenya. 

Figure 2 – Namibian Community Farmers 

Phase 2: The first countries importing foundation stock outside Southern Africa and Israel 

This phase includes the first countries to import foundation stock from their original countries, which included stock taken from the wild. Countries included in this group are USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, UK and Northern Continental European countries such as The Netherlands, Denmark, Germany and France. Other importers of stock during this phase were China, Japan, Malaysia, Thailand and Philippines. These countries imported a diversity of genetics not only from Namibia, Bophuthatswana and Zimbabwe but also from Tanzania and Kenya. South Africa was unable to export fertile eggs and live birds until 1998. However, there were many reports of illegal exports from South Africa, prior to the change in legislation. During this period it was impossible to identify the genetic origin of the birds. 

Phase 3: Phase 2 countries selling to more countries new to ostrich 

The countries listed in Phase 2 failed to successfully move from importation of foundation stock to commercial production. As a result they sold their stock onto new countries and accompanied by the same errors in production advice. The first recipient countries were Spain, Portugal, Italy and Greece in Europe and then onto Brazil and Argentina. Stock from these areas also moved into Eastern Europe and the Middle East. At the same time stock moved to Mexico, Peru, Colombia, Venezuela and Chile. Nowadays stock is moving into Nigeria and other North African countries, Pakistan and other areas still working to establish commercial poultry production.

Phase 4: Industry in Contraction 

Obtaining accurate production data is challenging, but a review of the last meaningful table published illustrates why this is. As at 2012 the industry is in a poor situation, with limited, if any slaughter activity in most areas. Several hundred birds per annum at the most in some locations. What about the Phase 1 countries? 

There are still some birds slaughtered in South Africa  probably around the 100,000 level per annum – as slaughter numbers have reduced steadily over the past 10 years. There are a number of reasons for this. One is several outbreaks of Avian Influenza that have resulted in the inability to export meat, which is a major source of revenue. The South African producers have failed to modernise their production systems with the result that they have failed to reduce their costs of production. This results in uncompetitive meat production when measured against the costs of mainstream meat products. The ostrich leather market virtually collapsed in recent years as a result of the inconsistencies in quality and supply from all sources. 

The political situation in Zimbabwe has prevented Zimbabwes production from developing its potential. Israels production failed when there was an outbreak of avian influenza in their poultry flocks preventing them from exporting their meat. Their industry had no local meat consumption as ostrich is not kosher, but ostrich is acceptable to consumers who require Halaal certification. 

 Time now to capitalise on lessons learnt 

At this point in time (2012) it is necessary to observe the development of the established commercial meat production species: pig, poultry (mainly chicken but with turkey, duck, guinea fowl and other poultry becoming players), along with cattle, sheep and goat as the mainstream current competition to ostrich meat. Not only does ostrich have to compete for shelf space in super markets for mainstream meat types but also other speciality meat types such as venison, emu, wild boar, kangaroo, rabbit and crocodile. 

The important factor in favour of ostrich is their ability to produce meat protein at similar feed efficiencies and therefore cost as pig and poultry. South Africa, the dominant producer of ostrich, remains working with outdated systems that continue to fail their producers. These outdated systems were passed onto the new developing countries. 

Over the past few decades, pig and poultry production has become extremely efficient in their production methods. For example in broiler production the growing chick spends 25% less time on the farm to reach the same weight than it did 25 years ago. In the same 25 years ostrich has gone through these various phases. 
These 25 years have provided the opportunity to gain experience and prove the potential that under the right management systems, ostrich can reach the same slaughter weight in less than ½ the accepted time. It now requires adoption of the knowledge learnt and implemented on a large enough scale to ensure it is commercially viable before it is too late.

Sultan’s landing bay

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Emirates landing bay ©muokikioko 2016

photos and text
©muoki kioko
2009-2016
email:muokikioko@gmail.com

There’s more than enough for ALL!

Stop telling people, is saying stop learning something new. Your new knowledge plus past experience is what creates more for humanity. That’s unless you wanted to keep sending a runner to deliver your mail 🙂
No single farmer can efficiently cater for his/households needs! To be able to create enough tomatoes to satisfy a market plus add value I’ll definitely need to create a team, I’ll need to engage ie pay for professional services and as I develop my line to the next level I’ll needs researchers!
Inefficiencies create contracted/diminished services and markets serving only one individuals interests. Those from East Africa remember the old telephone services, one player you had to beg for services ie with the engine of a train but acting like a bicycle – yes 50,000 jobs gone. However mobile telephony that replaced it created 100,000s of new jobs while creating better services..
The other day I received a mail about a monk that asked his apprentice to push over a cliff a poor families only asset (a weak cow that hardly gave 1ltr milk). Mean?
When the apprentice returned a few months later he found a prosperous family. What had happened? That family didn’t realize what they had until what they thought they had was taken away did they realise they had been sitting on much bigger unutilized assets ALL along.
So when information is posted here about chicken feed making does it kill jobs/peoples income ie chicken feed manufacture industry?

Let’s do the maths:

20million chicken × just 35grams daily = 7million kgs of feed daily ie 140,000 bags of feed daily.

– now 20 million chicken will ONLY feed ½ our population white meat protein for just 4 days in a year. What of the other 361 days?

– who has the capacity to produce 140,000 50kg bags of feed daily ie 1.6 bags per second just to cater for available birds!?
– If they were 100 producers each would have to produce 1bag every minute for 24hrs just to service the 20million birds

– who has the single capability to produce enough of each ingredient daily!?

-Are people even aware of how much of each ingredient is daily required to service the 140,000 bird’s!? Do our farmers even have the capacity!? Then we complain when the farmer relative keeps asking us for handouts while he’s not servicing an industry – a capacity he has at hand.

The information again provided is already in public domain created by your taxes and all it does is give a foundation to begin – doing is something else all together.

I don’t like changes! The gadget your reading this message on created massive changes in peoples sole source of income ie distribution of books and newspapers – throw it away if you are sincere you want to save their source of income.

photos and text
©muoki kioko
2009-2016
email:muokikioko@gmail.com

Swimming in Kilome

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Swimming in kilome ©muokikioko 2016

Swimming lessons now offered in Kilome!
As you can see the pool area has a view which on clear days faces Kilimanjaro. Come relax with family or friends swimming as you have buffet. Accommodation is available for those wishing for a weekend outing as you explore climbing Mt.Kalembwani or visit Ilovoto waterfalls or get a guide to search for the rare Plantanna frogs.
Should you have forgotten shopping at a supermarket, ‘No Problem’ as there’s a convenience store just 10-15minutes from here.
Located on the Mombasa highway about 80kms on your right hand from Nairobi as you begin descending the 1st section with a climbing lane. Sign board marked ACK.

photos and text
©muoki kioko
2009-2016
email:muokikioko@gmail.com

Standard Gauge Railway passes through Kilome

What are some characteristics of the new railway?

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overpasses at parks & over depressions

What of passenger travel?

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Why is it better at carrying containers?

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How does ‘Standard gauge railway’ compare to the current ‘metre gauge railway’?

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photos and text
©muoki kioko
2009-2015
email:muokikioko@gmail.com

Nzumbula/’Mukwaju’ (Tamarind)

Tamarind cultivation is nearly comparable with mango cultivation. Tamarind is a drought resistant tree, if grafted seedlings are planted can yield within 5years.
You can plant 7m X 7m distance. In this pattern, u can accommodate 204 plants in an hectare (around 80 plants in an acre)

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THE TAMARIND (Tamarindus indica) is a hardy tree well adapted to the semi-arid tropics.
This economically important tree is ideal for farm-forestry in the drought-prone regions. It is popularly referred to as indian dates.
The tamarind tree can serve as an
insurance crop and a “pension crop” for the farmers in the dry belts.
The time for a tamarind tree to reach its first harvest will vary, depending on the method of propagation.
A tree propagated by bud-grafting will come into bearing in 3 to 4 years, whereas trees propagated by seed may take up to 12 years. Practical management and local conditions will also affect the time for trees to bear. A well tended tree, grown from seed, in an open area will come into bearing in about 7years. Regardless of the method of propagation, pod yield should stabilise after 15 years.

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The tree has a pod bearing capacity of 50-60 years, but may yield fruit for over 200 years.
Fruit ripeness and yield Pod skin colour does not change rapidly with maturity and individual fruits mature at different times, so harvesting should be carried out
selectively. Mature fruits should have a brown shell, while immature pods have a green skin.
At maturity, the fruits are filled with a sticky brown to reddish-brown pulp and the seeds become hard and glossy.

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The pod skin becomes brittle as the pulp shrinks and the shell can be broken easily by hand. The ripe pod produces a hollow sound when tapped with the finger.
The yield of a tamarind tree varies
considerably and is dependent on genetic and environmental factors. Pod yield can also be cyclic, with bumper yields in every third year. A young tree may yield 20-30kg of fruit per tree in a year and a full-grown adult tree can yield about 150-200kg of fruit per tree in a year. An average tamarind tree may yield 100kg of fruit per tree in a year.

photos and text
©muoki kioko
2009-2015
email:muokikioko@gmail.com

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